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45ACP Mauser video

Finally got the barrel threaded, and was able to test it. AAC Ti-Rant 45 is mounted!

 

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45ACP Mauser update.

The day before Thanksgiving, my Ti-Rant 45 form 4 showed up at my dealer, and re-sparked my 45ACP Mauser project.
During the holiday, I carefully determined that I had a large-ring receiver, and ordered the Rhineland kit. Shipping was prompt, and 3 days later it arrived.
After un-boxing the kit, which was packaged extremely well by Rhineland, I took to the laboratory to screw the new in-the-white barrel into my receiver.
Alas. The new barrel was too big. I quickly snapped some pictures, and right before my wife served dinner, mailed them off to Rhineland, asking him what the deal was.

Shorty after he responded that I did indeed have a hybrid bastard-child of a gun, a large ring receiver with a small ring thread. Just my luck. “No problem,” he said, “I’ll send you a small ring one, send me the large ring one back when you can”. I promptly sent my barrel back, and in the mean time, Rhineland had sent me replacement already, along with the back-ordered ejector. No charge on the shipping.

The replacement barrel fit like a glove. I screwed in the barrel, inserted a 45ACP No GO gauge in the chamber with the bolt, and determined my headspace, alternating between GO and NO GO gauges, until I found the right spot.
Tighten the lock ring with some Blue Loc-tite on the treads, confirm headspace, and step 1 is done.
After that, I installed the magazine adapter and extended ejector, and after a bit of tweaking and filing, I got ‘er cycling and feeding smoothly.

The initial range trip was successful today, although the Kimber magazine I had modified to function properly at home, proved less reliable than a unmolested Chip McCormick magazine. Unlike some previous builder stated in their Youtube build video, I don’t have to “ram” the bolt home to get a positive feed, just some good momentum is enough.

Next up for this project:

  • Remove the barrel and have it threaded .578″x28 for use with a suppressor;
  • Reinstall barrel, and refinish the received and barrel. I’m thinking a simple Brownells spray-on finish.
  • Come up with a solution for sights of some kind. A way to low-mount a Doctor/RPD-II would be ideal.

Zombie Slayer SBR Mauser

I received an email this morning, from viper5243, about his SBR 8mm Mauser, I’ve featured on here before.
He informed that he’s had his Mauser refinished, turning it into a Zombie Killer rifle.

The rifle looks great, the addition of the DeGroat Flash Enhancer and the Trench Magazine really make it a one-of-a-kind. Like it wasn’t one already…

The excellent work appears to be performed by 7.62 Precision Custom Firearm Finishes. More pictures can be seen on their site as well. 

Model of 1911 US Navy

The gun’s serial number tells us that it was built by Colt in 1918, part of a batch made for the US Navy.
It appears to be in original condition, and as one can expect from a firearm this old, the finish is quite worn. The barrel has a surprising amount of rifling left.

If this gun could tell its story….

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Colt SP1

Picked up a nice Colt SP1.
It’s an old Sing Sing correctional facility rifle, and has that nice “been there – done that” look…


MAC Attack!

My Friend Rob’s new toy: ’84 MAC 11/9

Interesting Firearms: DeLisle Silent Carbine

I got to handle and photograph a DeLisle Silent Carbine today. Unfortunately not the original, but the next best thing: A Valkyrie Arms replica.

A brief history of the DeLisle Silent Carbine.
In 1943, Mr William Godfrey DeLisle submitted his .45 ACP DeLisle Carbine prototype to Sir Malcolm Campbell of the Combined Operations HQ for unofficial testing. The testing was done at the Atlantic Seashore, and the gun was noted to have no muzzleflash, even at low light and was “inaudible” at 50 yards. Grouping of 2″ at 50 yards was reported.
DeLisle was ordered to produce an additional small number of carbines, and with the assistance of a few machinists, out of rejected SMLE rifles and Thompson Submachinegun barrels, 17 additional carbines were produced.
These 17 guns were directly put into the hands of British Commando units.
On January 12th of 1944, Mr DeLisle was informed that the “trials to date had been promising”, and by August of 1944, Sterling Engineering Company started production of the carbine, with few exterior modifications. About 130 units were made by Sterling, of which 106 being delivered to Combined Operations.
In the meantime, the 17 prototypes had been used extensively in France by British Commandos, on hit and run missions, all while the ordnance board was still reviewing the design and testing.

The gun pictured is a Valkyrie Arms replica. Valkyrie built the gun true to the original blue-prints, including the design of the suppressor.

SMLE No#1 Action

Large Volume Suppressor. The Design of the suppressor was a basic Maxim design, consisting of 2 expansion chambers and a simple yet effective spiral diffusion system.

The rifle is fed from a standard 7 round 1911 magazine.


The bore is off-center, to minimize disturbance of the gasses, making the suppressor more effective.



The Valkryie Arms replica is a beautifully built rifle, and not often encountered. Definitely a rare and desirable piece, even for a replica!

I hope to be able to shoot the rifle at my next visit.

Mauser project revisited, with a new spin!

For a while now, I’ve had the urge of SBRing a Mauser, and cutting the barrel to 7″, turning it into an evil spirits defying flame-thrower/car alarm setter-offer.

I started off with a shot out M38 Turkish Mauser, I had rescued from an ATI plastic sniper stock, and a sporterized 98K stock I found on eBay.
After that, the project pretty much sat idle in my safe, awaiting time and money to continue.

And then I ran across Rhineland Arms, who sells a kit to convert a 98 Mauser into .45ACP. Fed by a 1911 magazine seated in an adapter, the gun features a 16.25″ barrel, and an extended ejector. And of course with my AAC Ti-Rant 45 suppressor on the way, I couldn’t think of a better project. No action noise and a short and handy subsonic pistol caliber rifle. a German/Turkish based abdomination of a DeLisle? William De Lisle will roll over in his grave if he finds out…

I decided to remove the shot out barrel from the receiver. I soaked the threads overnight with Mouse Milk, and heated a section of the barrel to red hot, about 6″ from the muzzle. Once the barrel was nice and hot, I bent the barrel 90 degrees, to ease the removal process. After carefully rigging the received in a vice, I added a cheater bar to the now 90 angled barrel, and broke the barrel free, easier as I had expected.

Then, with the barrel removed, I cut the barrel down to 16.5″ so I could make a mock-up of the rifle with a 16.25 barrel.

The barrel, removed from the receiver and cut to 16.5″.

Here she is, in all her glory:

I still have to come up with a solution for a sight. I’m not sure if I will be installing original Mauser sights, or if I am going to run a small red-dot. The benefit of a red dot is that it will clear a suppressor at the muzzle.

Nazi marked Belgian Browning Hi-Power

The FN P35 “Hi-Power” had been in production since 1935. Designed by John Moses Browning, and completed by Dieudonne Saive, the pistol was chambered in 9mm and had a 13 round capacity, and was a desirable military firearm. For comparison, the German issued P.08 Luger and P.38 held 8 rounds of 9mm each. When the German forces invaded and occupied Belgium in 1940, they also took over the FN (Fabrique Nationale, in Herstal Belgium) plant.

The Hi-Power was immediately liked by the Germans, and reassigned the designation Pistole 640(b)

The pre-war inventories of parts at the FN were used to produce more of the Pistole 640(b), all bearing Nazi Waffenamts and the typical swastika-eagle stamps.
When in early ’42 the pre-war inventories ran out, the German led war-production was started up, and most Hi-Powers after that had wooden grips, unlike the synthetic grips used on prior production guns.

My friend Jason owns one of these war-production Hi-Powers. His pistol has a WaA140 waffenamt in it, which indicates it was produced in Belgium between 1942 and 1944 and inspected by the Wehrmacht inspectors in Luttich, Belgium.
His grandfather brought the pistol with him when he returned home from fighting WWII, along with a holster and loaded magazine.

Jason was kind enough to let me photograph this interesting pistol. Unfortunately I forgot to photograph the headstamps on the ammunition it came with. Perhaps another time.

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A sad picture

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I came across this picture of a government decommissioned Colt M16.