Suppressor

.22 Suppressor Upgrade.

A few years ago, I bought a used Coastal P22 suppressor. It wasn’t supposed to be user serviceable, but after time, it kind of jailbroke itself. The baffles were of a very simple washer-spacer washer-spacer design. Truthfully, the performance of the thing wasn’t even close to more modern stuff, like my Outback II-D.

Coastal P22

 

I decided to see what could be done about upgrading it and having a more modern baffle stack, or even a mono-core.
My friend Chuck from LRM Technologies told me “No problem” and the old girl was on its way.

Fast forward to a few days ago, when I received it back.

IMG_0882Chuck re-used the tube, and made some nifty wrenches for disassembly. One for the end cap, and one for the back/core assembly.

IMG_0883New core next to old tube. The 1/2×28″ threading is a stainless steel insert in the aluminum core.

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I haven’t had much time to shoot it yet, but so far the performance looks to be promising.

 

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What’s in your silencer?

One of my employees purchased a nifty little Snap-On Borescope, with a tiny lighted head the other day. Of course I commandeered it immediately for scientific purposes…

Let’s take a look at my old Gemtech M4-02. Purchased little over 7 years ago, it’s seen thousands and thousands of rounds. Most on 11.5″ guns. Some FA, but not a lot. A good amount of .22 as well. Plated and lead. Overall, a good amount of abuse.
I’ve recently started noticing that it just wouldn’t suppress as well as other .223 cans, so I became suspicious.

Now – the pics below are taken off my TV screen, I plan to buy a proper adapter to get the images digitally into my computer. Until then, this will have to do.

Let’s start from the blast baffle:
Blast baffle

Nothing much to see, lots of carbon buildup.

 

Second baffle.

IMG_5895A bit jagged, rough edges, but still relatively round.

Moving on, the third baffle.

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Far from round, an unbelievable amount of material built up around the edges. Interestingly enough, it’s all facing the muzzle. That leads me to believe we’re looking at jackets, or lead, piled up on top of each other along with a healthy bit of erosion.

 

And finally, the end cap.

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The end cap has what I would describe as “the rolling hills of lead” built up around it. Seems very tick, some spots a bit blue in tint, and very smooth, compared to the jagged mess we saw earlier.

Dr. Dater from Gemtech has informed me that they may be able to rebuild my can, which I am eager to have done.

After talking with Stalking Rhino about rebuilding it or even converting it to a dedicated .22 can, I’ve decided to hold off, as the work, which will undoubtedly be top notch, is inherently cost prohibitive compared to the purchase price of the original can. But that’s part of the game.

 


Some random shots

Gemtech M4-02


45ACP Mauser video

Finally got the barrel threaded, and was able to test it. AAC Ti-Rant 45 is mounted!

 


45ACP Mauser update.

The day before Thanksgiving, my Ti-Rant 45 form 4 showed up at my dealer, and re-sparked my 45ACP Mauser project.
During the holiday, I carefully determined that I had a large-ring receiver, and ordered the Rhineland kit. Shipping was prompt, and 3 days later it arrived.
After un-boxing the kit, which was packaged extremely well by Rhineland, I took to the laboratory to screw the new in-the-white barrel into my receiver.
Alas. The new barrel was too big. I quickly snapped some pictures, and right before my wife served dinner, mailed them off to Rhineland, asking him what the deal was.

Shorty after he responded that I did indeed have a hybrid bastard-child of a gun, a large ring receiver with a small ring thread. Just my luck. “No problem,” he said, “I’ll send you a small ring one, send me the large ring one back when you can”. I promptly sent my barrel back, and in the mean time, Rhineland had sent me replacement already, along with the back-ordered ejector. No charge on the shipping.

The replacement barrel fit like a glove. I screwed in the barrel, inserted a 45ACP No GO gauge in the chamber with the bolt, and determined my headspace, alternating between GO and NO GO gauges, until I found the right spot.
Tighten the lock ring with some Blue Loc-tite on the treads, confirm headspace, and step 1 is done.
After that, I installed the magazine adapter and extended ejector, and after a bit of tweaking and filing, I got ‘er cycling and feeding smoothly.

The initial range trip was successful today, although the Kimber magazine I had modified to function properly at home, proved less reliable than a unmolested Chip McCormick magazine. Unlike some previous builder stated in their Youtube build video, I don’t have to “ram” the bolt home to get a positive feed, just some good momentum is enough.

Next up for this project:

  • Remove the barrel and have it threaded .578″x28 for use with a suppressor;
  • Reinstall barrel, and refinish the received and barrel. I’m thinking a simple Brownells spray-on finish.
  • Come up with a solution for sights of some kind. A way to low-mount a Doctor/RPD-II would be ideal.

Interesting Firearms: DeLisle Silent Carbine

I got to handle and photograph a DeLisle Silent Carbine today. Unfortunately not the original, but the next best thing: A Valkyrie Arms replica.

A brief history of the DeLisle Silent Carbine.
In 1943, Mr William Godfrey DeLisle submitted his .45 ACP DeLisle Carbine prototype to Sir Malcolm Campbell of the Combined Operations HQ for unofficial testing. The testing was done at the Atlantic Seashore, and the gun was noted to have no muzzleflash, even at low light and was “inaudible” at 50 yards. Grouping of 2″ at 50 yards was reported.
DeLisle was ordered to produce an additional small number of carbines, and with the assistance of a few machinists, out of rejected SMLE rifles and Thompson Submachinegun barrels, 17 additional carbines were produced.
These 17 guns were directly put into the hands of British Commando units.
On January 12th of 1944, Mr DeLisle was informed that the “trials to date had been promising”, and by August of 1944, Sterling Engineering Company started production of the carbine, with few exterior modifications. About 130 units were made by Sterling, of which 106 being delivered to Combined Operations.
In the meantime, the 17 prototypes had been used extensively in France by British Commandos, on hit and run missions, all while the ordnance board was still reviewing the design and testing.

The gun pictured is a Valkyrie Arms replica. Valkyrie built the gun true to the original blue-prints, including the design of the suppressor.

SMLE No#1 Action

Large Volume Suppressor. The Design of the suppressor was a basic Maxim design, consisting of 2 expansion chambers and a simple yet effective spiral diffusion system.

The rifle is fed from a standard 7 round 1911 magazine.


The bore is off-center, to minimize disturbance of the gasses, making the suppressor more effective.



The Valkryie Arms replica is a beautifully built rifle, and not often encountered. Definitely a rare and desirable piece, even for a replica!

I hope to be able to shoot the rifle at my next visit.


Upgraded Gemtech Outback I – back from Gemtech!

As I mentioned in a previous post, I had sent my Outback I into Gemtech to get upgraded.
I had opted for a Titanium blast baffle and the rest of the stack in Aluminum.

Due to a mistake at Gemtech, after 4 weeks I received my unit back….un-touched! Neatly sealed in a sleeve with a takedown tool, but un-touched, un-cleaned, and still unserviceable!

After a phonecall with Gemtech, Joey and Kel took care of the return shipping for me, and offered me a free shirt or pouch for the inconvenience. I declined.

Two days later, when my can was delivered at Gemtech, I received a phonecall from Dr. Phil Dater at Gemtech, apologizing profusely for the mistake. He offered to upgrade all my baffles to Titanium. I was hesitant at first, but Dr. Dater assured me that he would be happy to do so, so I gave in at last…

Here it is, disassembled, with the Ti baffles and Aluminum takedown tool.

The new endcap, removable with the tool for disassembly.

The mounting side of the can. The only thing they didn’t replace on the unit is the tube itself.

I’ve done some limited shooting with it, but it was hard to tell how loud it really was, as I shot it indoors. It does seem quiet, probably quieter than it was. So far, I’m impressed with the upgraded unit, and I’m very impressed and pleased with the way Gemtech took care of me when the mistake was made.

 


Hi-Standard OSS Pistol.

The illustrious .22 suppressed Hi-Standard HD, has seen use since the OSS days of WWII. These guns are usually based on the older models A, B, D and E.

Less common, is to see a suppressed model based on the model 107 Military.

I came across the pictures below on Falfiles a while ago. The poster made no claim to the weapon, and didn’t know anything about it.
The serial number range dates the gun to be a built between 1968 and 1972. Is it still considered an OSS gun? OSS turned into the CIA in 1947…

From the looks of it, it has seen some use. Perhaps in S.E. Asia?


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Gemtech Outback Upgrade.

Kel from Gemtech recently pointed out that they now have the “Gemtech – Have it your way” upgrade program for the Outback and Outback II line of .22lr silencers.

I’ve decided to send mine in, as it is very old, and not user serviceable. It also doesn’t quite compete with the modern cans anymore, a recently purchased YHM Mite was quieter than the Outback.

The options Gemtech offers in the “Have it your way” means that the owner has a choice in materials for the blast baffle, and the following 5 K-Baffles. The choices are Aluminum, Stainless Steel and Titanium. I chose for a Titanium blast baffle, as it takes the brunt of the blast and crap, and aluminum baffles for the remaining 5 K’s.
Stainless steel is a nice option as well, as it is easy to clean, but it is also heavier. And that is less desirable with a .22 silencer this size.
The Outback weighs in at 4.3 Oz. at the time of shipping. It would be interesting to see the weight change when I receive it back.
I think my choice is a good one. The can will go out in tomorrow’s UPS. Look for an update once it comes back!

My Outback right before sending it in to get upgraded.


10/22 Bolt Noise.

Sometimes, when shooting my 10/22 suppressed, I reach over with my left arm, and with my thumb, I jam the bolt forward, stopping the gun from cycling after each shot. I find it to be quieter to the shooter. It really allows you to hear how the silencer performs.

Even with a Polyurethane Buffer, the action is still relatively loud.

On a certain website, owned by a guy that researches silencers, the JG Bolt Lock device was tested. The device worked as advertised, and a noise reduction of less than 1.5dB was measured using standard velocity CCI. I would love to post a link, but the site’s owner not only charges folks to read his reviews, his Terms of Use are pretty out there. I won’t risk getting sued.

So I thought I’d build my own. If anything, just to save my thumb.

I had some black plastic material around, commonly used for gun-stands etc. I took a strip of the material, and after carefully setting up my precision milling machine, I cut a rough prototype.

A Dremel cutting bit at over 2000 RPM cut the material just fine.

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