NFA

Hi-Standard update.

A while back, I posted about an OSS type Hi-Standard build. The project had somewhat changed, and I recently received one of my barrels back, threaded, fitted and blued. A true work of art, the blueing is very deep and the thread protector blends in very well.

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.22 Suppressor Upgrade.

A few years ago, I bought a used Coastal P22 suppressor. It wasn’t supposed to be user serviceable, but after time, it kind of jailbroke itself. The baffles were of a very simple washer-spacer washer-spacer design. Truthfully, the performance of the thing wasn’t even close to more modern stuff, like my Outback II-D.

Coastal P22

 

I decided to see what could be done about upgrading it and having a more modern baffle stack, or even a mono-core.
My friend Chuck from LRM Technologies told me “No problem” and the old girl was on its way.

Fast forward to a few days ago, when I received it back.

IMG_0882Chuck re-used the tube, and made some nifty wrenches for disassembly. One for the end cap, and one for the back/core assembly.

IMG_0883New core next to old tube. The 1/2×28″ threading is a stainless steel insert in the aluminum core.

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I haven’t had much time to shoot it yet, but so far the performance looks to be promising.

 


HK21 – A work of art.

One of my holy grails in belt-fed guns is the HK21.
A good friend of mine has acquired one of these beauties recently, and while the sear pack is in the process of going from dealer to dealer, the rifle itself was transferred with a semi trigger pack as a Title I firearm.

Fortunately, it resides in my safe for a while until the owner comes around to claim it.
I took the opportunity to take a closer look at it. Whilst not 100% familiar with the differences in 21 models, I know that this is a non-E model, as it has the slide-out feed tray vs. the swing-down version of the 21E.

The rifle is clearly based on the G3 receiver, with hefty reinforcements in place to keep things together. Functionally the 21 is very similar to the G3, rounds come in below the bolt and strip forwards through the link into the chamber. Technically it’s possible to get a magazine adapter and have it run from a normal HK magazine.

Having shot one on a few occasions, I can truly say it’s an impressive piece of machinery, simple yet cleverly designed, usually to be expected from Germans…
The rifle is chambered in 7.62×51, which in full auto makes you appreciate the 18 Lbs of the gun, although it still makes you very aware of what you’re doing.

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Inverted belt allow the rounds to be stripped out from the bolt riding above in the forward cycle.

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Slide-out style feed tray.

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Quick change barrel control. Unlatch, rotate up, and the barrel is free.

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1200 Meter sight.

Stay posted for a future range report!


What’s in your silencer?

One of my employees purchased a nifty little Snap-On Borescope, with a tiny lighted head the other day. Of course I commandeered it immediately for scientific purposes…

Let’s take a look at my old Gemtech M4-02. Purchased little over 7 years ago, it’s seen thousands and thousands of rounds. Most on 11.5″ guns. Some FA, but not a lot. A good amount of .22 as well. Plated and lead. Overall, a good amount of abuse.
I’ve recently started noticing that it just wouldn’t suppress as well as other .223 cans, so I became suspicious.

Now – the pics below are taken off my TV screen, I plan to buy a proper adapter to get the images digitally into my computer. Until then, this will have to do.

Let’s start from the blast baffle:
Blast baffle

Nothing much to see, lots of carbon buildup.

 

Second baffle.

IMG_5895A bit jagged, rough edges, but still relatively round.

Moving on, the third baffle.

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Far from round, an unbelievable amount of material built up around the edges. Interestingly enough, it’s all facing the muzzle. That leads me to believe we’re looking at jackets, or lead, piled up on top of each other along with a healthy bit of erosion.

 

And finally, the end cap.

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The end cap has what I would describe as “the rolling hills of lead” built up around it. Seems very tick, some spots a bit blue in tint, and very smooth, compared to the jagged mess we saw earlier.

Dr. Dater from Gemtech has informed me that they may be able to rebuild my can, which I am eager to have done.

After talking with Stalking Rhino about rebuilding it or even converting it to a dedicated .22 can, I’ve decided to hold off, as the work, which will undoubtedly be top notch, is inherently cost prohibitive compared to the purchase price of the original can. But that’s part of the game.

 


Silent Loadout.

Getting ready for a class coming up using suppressed only carbines, I took a picture of my load out so far.

KISS Carbine

 

Rifle Specs:

  • Spike’s Tactical lower;
  • A1 upper;
  • Custom re-profiled 10″ barrel;
  • VLTOR stock
  • KAC RAS
  • Surefire 951 LED lamp
  • Gemtech M4-02 Piranha
  • Hogue Grip.

 


A rare beauty.

At the last Hernando Machine-gun shoot I came across this beautiful Argentina model 1895 Maxim.

In 1895 the Argentinean government placed an order for 50 Maxim guns with Maxim Nordenfelt Guns and Ammunition Company Limited in England. The guns carried serial numbers 1-50.
When the need for more guns arose, another order for 150 more guns was placed in 1898, but thsi time with the Deutsche Waffen und Munitionsfabriken (DWM), licensed Maxim manufacturers at the time.

Numbered 51-200, all the guns were chambered in Belgium Mauser 7.65×53. With the exception of numbers 181-200, all the Maxims built for the Argentinian contract had brass water jackets.
In 1909, Argentina adopted the new 7.65x53mm Spitzer round with the pointed bullet and flatter trajectory.  All of Argentina’s Maxims were then re-barreled for the new cartridge and the long sight bar was shortened for the high-speed, flatter trajectory of the new cartridge.

In the 1950s, the guns had become obsolete, and 91 units were sold and exported to the US. The rest of the guns remained in Argentina, in museums, officers mess’ etc. Of the 91 sol to the US, 8 were re-exported, 18 were government owned and ended up in museums, storage and some were destroyed. The remaining 55 US guns ended up in private collections.

The gun I photographed carries number 143, and was part of the second DWM order in 1898.

Cooling down during a cease-fire.

Cooling down during a cease-fire.  The gun is set in its original Ackland tripod, made in England by VSM (Vickers, Sons & Maxim)

The gun's number, year and manufacturer can clearly be seen.

Note the wooden feed assist roller in the brass feed block.

The wooden feed roller in the brass feed housing.

Note the Spanish safety marking, and "143" in the trigger and back plate.

(Source: Small Arms Defense Journal for data.)


Keep It Simple, Sucker!

“Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication.” – Leonardo Da Vinci.


Sten MkII.


First time out with the Sten MkII.


Zombie Slayer SBR Mauser

I received an email this morning, from viper5243, about his SBR 8mm Mauser, I’ve featured on here before.
He informed that he’s had his Mauser refinished, turning it into a Zombie Killer rifle.

The rifle looks great, the addition of the DeGroat Flash Enhancer and the Trench Magazine really make it a one-of-a-kind. Like it wasn’t one already…

The excellent work appears to be performed by 7.62 Precision Custom Firearm Finishes. More pictures can be seen on their site as well. 


MAC Attack!

My Friend Rob’s new toy: ’84 MAC 11/9