Handguns

A 1911 you don’t see every day.

My friend Todd was kind enough to let me take some pictures of his Remington Rand. The gun has been in his family for quite some time, and unfortunately for me – he doesn’t want to part with it…

Remington Rand 2

Remington Rand

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Browning Hipower

Earlier this year, I stumbled across a Hipower for sale. The seller lived close to me, and a deal was made.
I took the following pictures, and put her in the safe.

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Not too long after, I acquired an M&P 9mm, which I shot suppressed, and started carrying. But every time I retrieved it from the safe, I’d hear a weeping sound coming from the back. Upon further investigating, I found the Hipower again.

Realizing a steel handgun is much more to my liking, I immediately dumped the M&P and picked up some grips for the Hipower. I went with VZ Simonich grips. Very aggressive, but also a very positive grip. Next up was the magazine safety and thumb safety.

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The magazine safety has a great effect on the trigger, and after removing mine, I noticed a vast improvement. The safety removal is a simple process, and can be done in under an hour easily.

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The thumb safety on these things are “vague” and not as positive as the 1911’s thumb safeties. It bothered me enough that I decided to order the Cylinder & Slide extended safety. A nice piece of work, and with some minor fitting it was just about a drop-in fit. Again, a huge improvement over stock. I now carry it “Condition One”, hammer back, safety on, round in the chamber.
On carrying, I found that the gun fits perfectly in my Milt Sparks VMII for a 4″ 1911.

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Next up on the to-do list is a set of Warner sights. Chuck is famous for his 1911 TRS True Radius Sear jigs, and offers a sight set and TRS Sear for the Hipower as well.
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(Image from Chuck Warner’s site WarnerPistols.com)

I intend to send him my gun in January for sight installation and barrel crowning.
Lastly, she’ll get his TRS sear and a C&S ring style hammer.


Hi-Standard update.

A while back, I posted about an OSS type Hi-Standard build. The project had somewhat changed, and I recently received one of my barrels back, threaded, fitted and blued. A true work of art, the blueing is very deep and the thread protector blends in very well.

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Some random shots

Gemtech M4-02


Jericho 941 Pistol.

In 1990, Israeli Military Industries introduced the Jericho 941. A design based on the very succesful CZ75, the pistols were assembled with components from the Italian contractor Tanfolio.

The gun pictured here is the 9mm Sub-Compact model, using a shorter barrel in the full size frame.
It was imported before 2008 by Magnum Research as the “Baby Eagle Pistol”
I carry this gun loaded with Hornady TAP 147 grain.

The weight of the pistol when loaded is around 2.6 Lbs,  taming recoil and making it easy to shoot. The grip angle and the palm swell in the back strap make for an overall very comfortable grip. The Hogue Wrap-around adds to that. The polygonal rifling in the barrel lengthens barrel life, and some say adds accuracy. I find the gun to be very accurate.

Although the pistol looks very similar to the CZ75, it has a few differences. For one, the full size model is considerably heavier, it weighs 2.4 Lbs, compared to the 1.7 Lbs of the CZ75. Another major difference is the decocker/safety in the 941, compared to the CZ, which has a separate decocker.

9mm Sub Compact model.


Street robberies and you – The Basics.

I came across this interesting article, posted on AR15.com.

Especially with the current rise in Concealed Carry Permits issued country-wide, I thought it was worth posting it here as well.

Background
First, my info. I worked in the street of one of America’s most violent, dangerous cities for 15 years. I usually worked in the worst part of that city. I spent 15 years in patrol. I liked patrol. It was wild. Most of the time I worked in areas covered in ghetto. By that I mean large housing projects combined with run down slum housing. I have worked all shifts. Later I became an investigator including a robbery investigator. I have spent countless hours in interrogation rooms talking to hold up men. I know them. I am still an investigator but have quit playing the Robbery game because my family was starting to forget what I looked like.

The Enemy

Some may object to me calling hold up men “the enemy”. You can call them whatever you like. I can assure you however they are as deadly an enemy as you will find anywhere but the battlefield. Even many soldiers probably lack the viciousness and utter disregard for life most hold up men possess.

No one wakes up in the morning one day and decides to become an armed robber. It is a gradual process that requires some experience and desensitizing. Before a man will pick up a gun and threaten to kill people who have done him no harm in order to get their usually meager possessions he has to get comfortable with some things.

He has to get used to seeing others as objects for him to exploit. He has to accept he may be killed while robbing. He has to accept the felony conviction for Robbery will haunt him all his life. He has to accept he may need to kill a completely innocent person to get away with his crime.
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Just a picture…

For things that go bump in the night


A Nazi 1911….

Around the same time that the US was choosing a new semi-auto pistol, the Kingdom of Norway was also looking to standardize on a new pistol. They actually ended up selecting Colt’s 1903 Model. However, before they could go into full production of the 1903, the US selected the 1911, which caused Norway to reconsider.

Norway ended up selecting the 1911 with a minor change in the design of the slide stop lever. This was designated as the Norwegian Model of 1914, also known as the Kongsberg Colt (as it was made under license in the Kongsberg factory in Norway).

At the start of WW2, Germany invaded and occupied Norway. Production of the Kongsberg Colt continued while under Nazi occupation. It was designated as the Pistole 657(n). Approximately 8000 were made during the period 1940-1945.

However, only in the last year of production did the Germans add the Waffenamt stamp indicating it was a german weapon. This is one of approximately 920 pistols to receive the German Waffenamt, marking it as a Nazi 1911. Notice the Norwegian modified slide stop lever. Makes it easier to operate with one hand.

As posted by member “Beetle” on Calguns.net, who owns this beautiful and very rare peace of history.


Model of 1911 US Navy

The gun’s serial number tells us that it was built by Colt in 1918, part of a batch made for the US Navy.
It appears to be in original condition, and as one can expect from a firearm this old, the finish is quite worn. The barrel has a surprising amount of rifling left.

If this gun could tell its story….

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Nazi marked Belgian Browning Hi-Power

The FN P35 “Hi-Power” had been in production since 1935. Designed by John Moses Browning, and completed by Dieudonne Saive, the pistol was chambered in 9mm and had a 13 round capacity, and was a desirable military firearm. For comparison, the German issued P.08 Luger and P.38 held 8 rounds of 9mm each. When the German forces invaded and occupied Belgium in 1940, they also took over the FN (Fabrique Nationale, in Herstal Belgium) plant.

The Hi-Power was immediately liked by the Germans, and reassigned the designation Pistole 640(b)

The pre-war inventories of parts at the FN were used to produce more of the Pistole 640(b), all bearing Nazi Waffenamts and the typical swastika-eagle stamps.
When in early ’42 the pre-war inventories ran out, the German led war-production was started up, and most Hi-Powers after that had wooden grips, unlike the synthetic grips used on prior production guns.

My friend Jason owns one of these war-production Hi-Powers. His pistol has a WaA140 waffenamt in it, which indicates it was produced in Belgium between 1942 and 1944 and inspected by the Wehrmacht inspectors in Luttich, Belgium.
His grandfather brought the pistol with him when he returned home from fighting WWII, along with a holster and loaded magazine.

Jason was kind enough to let me photograph this interesting pistol. Unfortunately I forgot to photograph the headstamps on the ammunition it came with. Perhaps another time.

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