Nazi marked Belgian Browning Hi-Power

The FN P35 “Hi-Power” had been in production since 1935. Designed by John Moses Browning, and completed by Dieudonne Saive, the pistol was chambered in 9mm and had a 13 round capacity, and was a desirable military firearm. For comparison, the German issued P.08 Luger and P.38 held 8 rounds of 9mm each. When the German forces invaded and occupied Belgium in 1940, they also took over the FN (Fabrique Nationale, in Herstal Belgium) plant.

The Hi-Power was immediately liked by the Germans, and reassigned the designation Pistole 640(b)

The pre-war inventories of parts at the FN were used to produce more of the Pistole 640(b), all bearing Nazi Waffenamts and the typical swastika-eagle stamps.
When in early ’42 the pre-war inventories ran out, the German led war-production was started up, and most Hi-Powers after that had wooden grips, unlike the synthetic grips used on prior production guns.

My friend Jason owns one of these war-production Hi-Powers. His pistol has a WaA140 waffenamt in it, which indicates it was produced in Belgium between 1942 and 1944 and inspected by the Wehrmacht inspectors in Luttich, Belgium.
His grandfather brought the pistol with him when he returned home from fighting WWII, along with a holster and loaded magazine.

Jason was kind enough to let me photograph this interesting pistol. Unfortunately I forgot to photograph the headstamps on the ammunition it came with. Perhaps another time.

WaA140 waffenamt and swastika eagles visible on both slide and frame

This pistol has a matching serial number in the barrel, frame and slide.

Wooden war production grips.

With its holster and loaded magazine.

7 responses

  1. Charles Barber

    How much would this exact gun be worth, holster extra clip and all?

    March 9, 2013 at 20:34

  2. Michael

    Given the buyer around 1300.00 1400.00

    March 10, 2013 at 18:56

  3. Blue book calls for $1200 in 100% and $400 in 60%
    Most I’ve seen have been in 60%~80%.

    I think the $800 range is a good price for a decent example.

    March 10, 2013 at 20:37

  4. Ed

    I own this weapon is interesting enough who needs the $500 I think I’ll keep it It was used primarily by the SS only

    June 5, 2013 at 21:24

  5. joseph muthler

    I have one of these that my dad took off a German officer. It is the lowest serial number I have seen on any site @ 208**. I have 2 magazines and a holster with a little blueing issues but not enough for me to do anything with. And no it is not for sale. I am just trying to find info on it.

    July 2, 2013 at 09:26

  6. Ed

    I also own this gun plastic handles a little bluing wear

    November 5, 2013 at 19:56

  7. J. T.

    Jason’s Hi-Power in the photo above, was made in the latter part of 1943, based on the serial number. It is in great condition.
    I also own one that was produced early in 1943. It’s in the same condition as the example above. Mine came with 2 mags. and the pre-war Belgium black leather army holster, which has a large flap covering the entire rig, with a spare mag. pouch & brass closure. It was a souvenir brought home by a US Army vet.

    The Nazis provided their Hi-Power to both the SS and Paratrooper units, since each branch was promised by Hitler, to be equipped with the very best equipment, including weapons. As a military historian, I love the Hi-Power. I’m partial first & foremost to our beloved 1911, but the Hi-Power is a close second place. As a collector, all of us who own one of the Nazi produced models can take satisfaction, in that the Nazi stamped
    Hi-Power will always demand a premium. Keep in mind that over 2 Million Lugers were produced for WW1 & 2, and over 1 Million Walther P-38s were made in WW2. Yet, the Nazis were only able to manufacture roughly 320,000 of the Hi-Power model. Therefore, based strictly on production output, their Hi-Power will always be in high demand. I also own one of the Nazi marked Polish Radom 9mm pistols. It’s in good condition as well & still another example of a weapon the Nazi’s took advantage of, in supplying pistols to their troops in the field of battle.

    November 27, 2013 at 10:38

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